And Cashy is WINNING!

WINNING!

Our Hyde family from Missoula Montana is currently in Salt Lake City, celebrating with an elated family at beloved Uncle Sam‘s Badda Bing.

How do I know this? I was there 3 months ago – when we got results on Cashy’s first scan since his second bout with his PNET brain tumor wrapped around his optic nerve in that precious little boy’s noggin.

I sobbed that day….3 months ago. I was SO relieved….so happy.

This time – I cried when we all saw Cashy being sedated. Poor little man has been through so much – he knew what was going on. He wasn’t too happy to be going to sleep – and held his breath in defiance. He eventually relented, and his little body went limp.

To see that happen to a three year old (soon to be FOUR!) is heart wrenching – but a fact of life for the Hyde’s. A fact of life for many families around the world, unfortunately. Every day around the world thousands of children are diagnosed with cancer. When you really go looking and examine the numbers, it is chilling.

Today – we got heartwarming news – Cashy’s 2nd MRI came back with negative results. To quote Kalli Hyde’s Facebook post “SO ive tried posting this now 3 times……The verdict is in…..Cashy is still cancer free, and there is no evidence of reoccuring tumor!!! Still waiting on thoracic spine report, but cervical and lumbar spine is all clear as well! Thank you God, and thank you everyone for the prayers and support, we would’nt be where we are today without you all cheering Cashy on! Cashy your a rockstar, your my little three foot tall hero!! :)” Kalli also updated their blog – be sure to read up HERE

Cashy is such a hero and inspiration to so many. People hear about and read the news of Cashy’s success and burst out in tears of happiness. It happens in every state, every time – all across the nation, and around the world.

Cashy is a Warrior – and he is beating the scourge……that scourge is cancer.

Support the Cash Hyde Foundation TODAY! Join the Cashy Militia!

http://mtconnect.me/2012/03/19/you-want-to-save-the-children-start-here-start-now/

Help save childrens lives!

To learn about what happened to Montana’s Medical Cannabis law – please be sure to catch this documentary made entirely through the session – detailing the saga of medical cannabis in Montana. Be sure to see Code of the West

Also – I ran across this today – and felt it was important enough to share here. The author is a seated Judge in Brooklyn New York, and a Pancreatic Cancer survivor of 3 years.

He is also a medical cannabis user.

A Judge’s Plea for Pot

By GUSTIN L. REICHBACH
Published: May 16, 2012

New York Times Opinion Pages

 THREE and a half years ago, on my 62nd birthday, doctors discovered a mass on my pancreas. It turned out to be Stage 3pancreatic cancer. I was told I would be dead in four to six months. Today I am in that rare coterie of people who have survived this long with the disease. But I did not foresee that after having dedicated myself for 40 years to a life of the law, including more than two decades as a New York State judge, my quest for ameliorative and palliative care would lead me to marijuana.
Kristian Hammerstad

My survival has demanded an enormous price, including months of chemotherapy, radiation hell and brutal surgery. For about a year, mycancer disappeared, only to return. About a month ago, I started a new and even more debilitating course of treatment. Every other week, after receiving an IV booster of chemotherapy drugs that takes three hours, I wear a pump that slowly injects more of the drugs over the next 48 hours.

Nausea and pain are constant companions. One struggles to eat enough to stave off the dramatic weight loss that is part of this disease. Eating, one of the great pleasures of life, has now become a daily battle, with each forkful a small victory. Every drug prescribed to treat one problem leads to one or two more drugs to offset its side effects. Pain medication leads to loss of appetite and constipation. Anti-nausea medication raises glucose levels, a serious problem for me with my pancreas so compromised. Sleep, which might bring respite from the miseries of the day, becomes increasingly elusive.

Inhaled marijuana is the only medicine that gives me some relief from nausea, stimulates my appetite, and makes it easier to fall asleep. The oral synthetic substitute, Marinol, prescribed by my doctors, was useless. Rather than watch the agony of my suffering, friends have chosen, at some personal risk, to provide the substance. I find a few puffs of marijuana before dinner gives me ammunition in the battle to eat. A few more puffs at bedtime permits desperately needed sleep.

This is not a law-and-order issue; it is a medical and a human rights issue. Being treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, I am receiving the absolute gold standard of medical care. But doctors cannot be expected to do what the law prohibits, even when they know it is in the best interests of their patients. When palliative care is understood as a fundamental human and medical right, marijuana for medical use should be beyond controversy.

Sixteen states already permit the legitimate clinical use of marijuana, including our neighbor New Jersey, and Connecticut is on the cusp of becoming No. 17. The New York State Legislature is now debating a bill to recognize marijuana as an effective and legitimate medicinal substance and establish a lawful framework for its use. The Assembly has passed such bills before, but they went nowhere in the State Senate. This year I hope that the outcome will be different. Cancer is a nonpartisan disease, so ubiquitous that it’s impossible to imagine that there are legislators whose families have not also been touched by this scourge. It is to help all who have been affected by cancer, and those who will come after, that I now speak.

Given my position as a sitting judge still hearing cases, well-meaning friends question the wisdom of my coming out on this issue. But I recognize that fellow cancer sufferers may be unable, for a host of reasons, to give voice to our plight. It is another heartbreaking aporia in the world of cancer that the one drug that gives relief without deleterious side effects remains classified as a narcotic with no medicinal value.

Because criminalizing an effective medical technique affects the fair administration of justice, I feel obliged to speak out as both a judge and a cancer patient suffering with a fatal disease. I implore the governor and the Legislature of New York, always considered a leader among states, to join the forward and humane thinking of 16 other states and pass the medical marijuana bill this year. Medical science has not yet found a cure, but it is barbaric to deny us access to one substance that has proved to ameliorate our suffering.

Gustin L. Reichbach is a justice of the State Supreme Court in Brooklyn.

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Comments
  1. hunkabarry1 says:

    Wow really is inspiring news about Cashy.I can only hope that the medical world recognizes it as a cure So that this type of treatment could take place immediately to save others. I commend those involved with treating Cashy,without you this cure would have never taken place. This is a huge tool against marijuana discrimination. Should be billboards posted to help boost legalization both medically and recreational. Cheers with a joint held high!

  2. desiderata319 says:

    It is so good to see Cashy smile like that again! Peace and healing my little friend. Love, Desi

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